Call Me Maurice.

When I was seventeen it was a very good year, especially that summer. I took a trip across Europe thanks to my parents and a student ambassador program called People To People. One of my teachers–and to this day I don’t know which one–nominated me for it. This was before the internet, at least as we know it, and it was only by dumb luck that I stumbled–or rather was pushed, willingly, into it. We went through seven countries: Switzerland, Austria, Czechoslovakia back when it was still called that, one night in Germany, France, Spain, and finally Portugal, or, as I like to think of it, Spain’s Canada. We were about thirty teenagers crawling down the Iberian peninsula by bus, stopping in cathedrals and learning the culinary alphabet from Wienerschniztel to calamari, and along the way each of us was dropped off for short stopovers with families in Austria, France, and Spain. There are at least a dozen stories I could share, but for now I’ll stick with my time with the French family and le cheval terrible.
The French family lived just outside of Toulouse in a wonderful rustic farmhouse, and were really nice people. We exchanged Christmas and joyeux Noel cards for several years after my visit. They had a teenage son with whom I shared almost everything in common except a language, although he spoke a decent amount of English and I, well, I could do a passable Maurice Chevalier which cracked him up. In fact I entertained the whole family, especially their two Spaniels, one of whom was so taken with me she left a little present by my bed and I put my left foot right in it. They told me there was a local saying that a man who puts his left foot in le merde will be successful in life and I told them a dumb joke about how my friend came in with le merde in his hand and I said, “Why are you carrying dog shit?” and he replied, “Would you believe I almost stepped in this?” They thought this was worthy of Moliere and had me repeat it for guests which makes me think I could have pursued a career as a Franco-American standup comedian, but that’s another story.

Source: Wikipedia

One evening they thought it would be nice to visit some relatives who lived on a neighboring farm and share my scatalogical humor. And while the mother and son were taking the car they thought it would be fun if father and I went on horseback. I’d ridden a horse maybe twice in my life before then so I assumed I was well-prepared, although there’s a world of difference between impersonating Maurice Chevalier and being even a passable chevalier. And they assured me their horse Coquette–so aptly named–was very nice. She seemed to be nice, too, and very pretty with her dusky coat an flowing blonde mane, although gentlemen prefer brains. She ignored me and ate grass while I introduced myself and when I climbed aboard and said “giddyup” she ignored me and ate grass. And then when I tugged on the reins a little she ignored me and ate grass. When I said, “How do you put this thing in drive?” she lifted her head and started galloping down the road.
The farm, by the way, was adjacent to a French main highway. In the distance I could see a car coming in the opposite direction. “Whoa!” I told Coquette and then behind me the father started shouting “Pull to the right!” In English, amazingly, although even on the back of a galloping horse I think I would have known my gauche from my droite and none of us wanted to turn this into a scene from Equus. I pulled hard on the reins and Coquette suddenly stopped, trotted off to the side of the road, and proceeded to eat grass.
She was taken back for her paddock, the car was sent back for me, and the family kept assuring me “Coquette really is a very nice horse, but she doesn’t speak English.” Which I knew was half true, since I’d already learned she didn’t speak English.

 

9 Comments

  1. Gilly Maddison

    It’s risky to be a horse in France – they are therefore understandably unpredictable and occasionally quite ill-mannered. Some of them do speak English but pretend not too.

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      Perhaps I underestimate Coquette’s grasp of the language. And it does seem suspicious that she knew exactly when to start galloping.

      Reply
  2. Allison Everett

    I love so many things about this post. Mostly that you could do a passible Maurice. Also, Spain’s Canada. We call Nashville “Canada’s Mexico”.

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      Given the political differences Spain may actually be Portugal’s Canada rather than the other way around, but I always thought Florida was “Canada’s Mexico”, since so many Floridians spend the summer in Canada and so many Canadians spend the winter in Florida.

      Reply
      1. Allison Everett

        I meme this specifically as it relates to hockey. We see a lot of Canadians coming down when their teams play the Preds. It’s a lot cheaper for them to get into a game here then it would be in their hometown. Even with airfare, it’s just a good deal for them.

        Reply
  3. Arionis

    Ha! So the horse didn’t speak English huh? Sure its name wasn’t really Mr. Edouard? Did their pig (if they had one) speak Latin?

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      It wasn’t really a functioning farm–more of a rural estate, although they did have two dogs that spoke Spanish. The dogs were Spaniels, after all.

      Reply
  4. Ann Koplow

    Great memories and post, Maurice.

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      As the resident space cowboy I shall remember this comment.

      Reply

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