Totally Eclipsed Facts.

On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun. Anyone within the path of totality can see one of nature’s most awe-inspiring sights – a total solar eclipse. This path, where the moon will completely cover the sun and the sun’s tenuous atmosphere – the corona – can be seen, will stretch from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. Observers outside this path will still see a partial solar eclipse where the moon covers part of the sun’s disk.

–NASA

Facts About Eclipses:

The shadow cast by the Moon during an eclipse is known as the UMBRA. Being in it is known as TAKING UMBRAGE.

During an eclipse the temperature may drop between five and three thousand degrees.

People who are compelled to vocalize during an eclipse are known as Eclipse-O Singers.

If you sleep during an eclipse you’ll miss it.

The Moon does not shine during an eclipse. NASA engineers turn it off to save power.

What does an eclipse look like from Venus? We don’t know because your face would melt off.

The myth that eclipses are bad luck was dismissed in 1917 when scientists confirmed that eclipses are bad luck.

An eclipse was the inspiration for Albert Einstein’s haircut.

More than three-fourths of the Moon’s craters were formed during puberty.

The first photograph of an eclipse was taken, I don’t know, during an eclipse probably.

During an eclipse the Moon is mooning the Sun.

The dark side of the Moon is completely smooth during an eclipse because the Sun melts the cheese.

If you were to play Pink Floyd’s Dark Side Of The Moon during an eclipse the eclipse would be over before Dorothy says ” “Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.”

 

12 Comments

  1. Arionis

    I always look forward to your “facts”. Always evoke a few chuckles.

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      The fun thing is some of those “facts” really are true.

      Reply
  2. Ronnie

    got the glasses and am ready. We aren’t in the “path of totality” but we are close enough to enjoy the view.

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      I hope it was enjoyable. It’s amazing how much difference even a partial eclipse can make.

      Reply
  3. Paula

    Thanks for the useful facts. If nothing else, I’ve learned something today.

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      I hope you don’t put too much stock in my facts. Some of them are of questionable provenance.

      Reply
  4. Jay

    It was a big disappointment here, so thanks for bringing me into eclipse mania.

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      I’m sorry it was a disappointment there. I was afraid it was going to be cloudy here, but it turned out we had a clear view straight into the heart of the solar system. It was cool enough that I may stick around for the next one in five hundred years.

      Reply
  5. Gilly Maddison

    I am the kind of dimwit that says, in total wonder and amazement, ‘Really?’ when given facts like these. Yes, I’m serious. If you look up gullible in the dictionary it says Gilly. I got suspicious around No 3 and realised I’d been had by No 4. Very funny.

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      I’m afraid I’m somewhat incorrigible when it comes to this sort of thing. I hope you can take some comfort in knowing that I tried to make them believable at first to draw people in.

      Reply
  6. Ann Koplow

    This post eclipses all the other ones I’m reading today.

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      Thank you for the light of this comment.

      Reply

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