Such Jocund Company.

A guy got on the bus with a handful of daffodils, or buttercups as some people call them even though I’ve never found much butter in them. He seemed to be holding them very carefully but then while he was putting his money into the fare machine he dropped them and stopped to gently pick up each one. I watched him as he went and sat down close to the front of the bus. He wore a red sweatshirt and a pair of jeans. There were two young women sitting next to each other; they’d been giggling and talking. He tapped one on the shoulder and offered them each a daffodil. They smiled and took a couple. Then he moved to another seat and offered one to an older woman. They were the only women on the bus so they were the only ones who got daffodils.


I, of course, sat there stewing in my own curiosity. Where had he gotten the daffodils? Why was he offering them to only women? Maybe I would have liked one. Okay, I really didn’t want one, but how did he know that? He seemed kind of shy and quiet. When he offered the daffodils he did it quietly, just holding them out. He never said a word. When he moved to his final seat he looked out the window. I didn’t want to be overly aggressive or scare him. I just wanted to know why he was giving away daffodils. And I wanted to know where he got them. Maybe he picked them somewhere public. There are at least a couple of places I know of along the bus route where he might have picked daffodils. There are some spots in parks and even in yards where they just seem to come up on their own without being planted. Or maybe he grew them himself. Maybe they were from his own yard.
I had finally gotten up the nerve to get up and move to a seat near him and ask when the bus came to a stop and he got off. He walked to a shopping center, still holding at least half a dozen daffodils.
The next day at work my boss let everyone know that there was a chance we’d have to start working from home because of COVID-19. The day after we got the word. For at least the next two weeks I’ll be working from home. I’m not sure how long daffodil season lasts. Maybe I’ll have another chance to meet the daffodil guy. If I don’t, well, I’m glad I saw him even if I’m still filled with questions.

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10 Comments

  1. Rivergirl

    How lovely. Just a simple gesture to make someone smile. We definitely need more of that these days….

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      We really could use more simple gestures to make others smile. I’m still curious about that guy but I’m also glad I didn’t talk to him. I didn’t want to spoil the illusion.

      Reply
  2. BarbaraM

    Lovely story. Whatever the reasons.

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      Sometimes it’s best just to not know.

      Reply
  3. Arionis

    In New York he would have probably gotten mace in the face.
    Arionis recently posted…642 THINGS TO WRITE ABOUT – 6/642My Profile

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      Maybe. Southerners are definitely different, although I’ve heard some stories of New Yorkers actually being nice to each other. Go figure.

      Reply
  4. Ann Koplow

    Thanks for all you offer us here, Chris.

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      When I see someone doing good I like to pass it on, and I appreciate you passing it on in your comments.

      Reply
  5. mydangblog

    Daffodils are such lovely flowers, and this story was lovely too:-)

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      One of my favorite signs of spring is seeing daffodils come up. We have some random clumps in the yard that I think just spread there naturally.

      Reply

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