Summer Time.

So I found an Argiope aurantia in the yard and if you don’t know what that is you’re probably thinking I should hire whoever handles that sort of thing to get rid of it and if you do know what it is you’re almost certainly thinking I should hire whoever handles that sort of thing to get rid of it because you know it’s a great big spider. She wasn’t that big, though—it’s still early in the season, but it did remind me of the time when I was ten and found a fully grown one under the deck of my parents’ house. They’re quite beautiful with shiny black, white, yellow, and green bodies, and they build big circular webs with zigzag patterns. No one’s sure why they weave such obvious patterns into their webs—maybe it’s to warn birds away, or it’s for camouflage, or for some other reason.  They sit in the middle of their webs patiently waiting.

I’d visit the one under the deck three or four times a day sometimes and bring it prey which I know sounds pretty sadistic of me. At least I felt a little bit of guilt but it was also fascinating to watch. I’d catch a katydid, holding it by its leafy wings, and throw it into the web. The spider would rush over, bite the katydid once, injecting a toxic cocktail, and then start wrapping it. Some spiders wrap their prey in a single thread but an Argiope aurantia activates all its spinnerets at once producing a skein of silk that turns its catch into a mummy in seconds. Then it leaves its prey to sit and cook for a while because spiders invented ceviche long before humans did.

Sometimes when I came back later I’d find her sucking the juices from her wrapped meal. Then she’d pluck it loose from the web and let it drop to the ground. By nighttime the web would be gone. They eat part of their webs before going to sleep, recycling the protein, and producing a fresh, neat web the next day.

I spent the summer watching her grow bigger and bigger, but I tried not to get too attached. Even then I knew enough about biology to know that most spiders grow fast and put everything into producing children they won’t live to see. It’s sad but also beautiful.

I knew she was a she because the males are smaller and less distinctive. The males build a web near a female’s when it’s time to mate. I never did see her partner but one must have come around. By late August I could tell she was slowing down. She sometimes ignored the grasshoppers I threw into her web, conserving her energy while her internal organs slowly turned into eggs. The morning I found her in the upper part of her web next to what looked like a small mottled brown balloon I knew it was time. Summer at that age lasted forever and was also over in a blink.

Her children, if they survived the winter, had a tough time ahead of them, which is one of the sad facts of a spider’s life. They lay a thousand eggs or more as insurance because the world is a harsh place. Most won’t make it to adulthood.

The one I found in the garden earlier this week has been gone for a couple of days now. Her web is still there but it’s tattered. It’s unlikely she’s moved somewhere else. She picked a well-protected place. It just wasn’t protected enough, and there’s a long summer ahead of me.

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5 Comments

  1. M.L. James

    Christopher,
    I find spiders fascinating, too…from a distance. Loved your story about when you were young. Can’t help but think about Charlotte, ya know? I’m sorry that this one didn’t make it very far. Maybe there will be others. Who are spiders’ natural enemies? 🙁 Mona
    M.L. James recently posted…200th PostMy Profile

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      Mona, spiders are definitely enjoyed from a distance. I once caught a jumping spider that looked really cool and went to show it to my wife and it jumped down her blouse. And Charlotte’s Web has been and always will be one of my favorite books, although I wish Charlotte lived and Wilbur got made into bacon.
      Spiders have many enemies including wasps, birds, and each other, but there’s a happy ending: the spider that disappeared is now back!

      Reply
  2. ANN J KOPLOW

    I loved “Charlotte’s Web” as a kid, which made me love spiders, and I adore this post. Thanks, Chris.

    Reply
    1. Christopher Waldrop (Post author)

      I think all of us who read “Charlotte’s Web” when we were young learned to love spiders, which is why it should be required reading.

      Reply
  3. RIFAT

    This is really a great article and a great read for me. It’s my first visit to your blog and I have found it so useful and informative. Thank you

    Reply

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